About your Search

20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
administration and then under the first year of the obama administration. and each time the senate killed it. >> yeah. but the key thing there is that each time both the clinton administration and the obama administration tried to do this it was essentially a top-down, inside the beltway strategy. we are going after and trying to cajole and convince and persuade the members of the senate and the house to pass this legislation without first engaging the broad public and building a citizens movement, a issue public as i talked about before that was actually demanding change. because in the end politicians care about their job. and if they don't feel like there's a political price to pay for opposing action on climate change or alternatively a political opportunity to be had by being a leader on this issue, it's very easy for them to say, "you know what? i've got a lot of other things here on my plate to deal with. i've got lots of lobbyists coming into my office as well as people back home saying, do this, do that, do this. and it's not climate change. so until they feel that they have to act
celebrated silverhead chairman and ceo jamie dimon, said to be barack obama's favorite banker, an e-mail requesting an increase in the bank's risk taking received a two-word reply from dimon. i approve. but the well-connected dimon, whose bank was being bailed out by almost $25 billion from taxpayers even as he was making $35 million a year, was spared from testifying personally and having to dispose exactly what he knew about the shenanigans of his lieutenants and when he knew it. among the many of us who will be anxiously awaiting those revelations, should they come, is my guest sheila bear, a long-time republican. she was appointed the head of the fdic. during the financial collapse, she oversaw the takeover of more than 300 banks that went belly up and was an outspoken opponent of the taxpayer bailouts. as one influential observer wrote during that time, sheila bear never forgot her most important constituency isn't the thousands of banks she regulates but the millions of americans who use them. she now has the systemic risk council, an independent committee formed by the pugh c
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)